Fieldcraft Class Description and Gear List

Class Calendar here

Last updated 12APR2021

Task and Purpose:

To give the student a broad set of fundamental fieldcraft skills that could be used to protect life, property and liberty. Class will be 3.5 days long, conducted completely off-grid, living out of a ruck and under the conditions of a non-permissive environment while working in a team that is foot mobile on the land. I have a lot of material I want to get through and classes will run into the evening or later. Course will focus primarily on the following skills: rifle marksmanship, land navigation, wilderness survival, camouflage and small unit tactics.

This class will include daily hikes of 2-4 miles with your equipment (depending on how you pack this could be over 50 pounds) over rough terrain while conducting land navigation so being in good physical condition is advised. The intent isn’t to “break people off” in this class but the nature of the beast is what it is. I want to give everyone the opportunity to get as much realistic training as they can for their time and money and that might include facing some challenges and having to push outside of your comfort zone sometimes.

Price is $400 per person; cash, money order or barter. Payment is due in full prior to class unless other arrangements are made. Cancel within two weeks of class for a full refund. Class location is in southeastern Montana. The nearest “large” airports are Rapid City, SD, Billings, MT, and Bismarck, ND. The road into the training area is primitive and a 4×4 is advised. If you’re renting a vehicle, or other wise don’t have access to a 4×4, transportation into the site will be provided. To register email me at shocktroop0351@tutanota.com. (Do yourself a favor and get a free tutanota account while you’re at it!)

Required Equipment

All of the “required equipment” will be required to be carried during the land navigation courses. In addition we will be camping in a different location each night without returning to the vehicles so any equipment you want at night will have to be carried as well. If, during the course, you don’t feel this is possible anymore but would still like to participate to the best of your ability you will still be allowed to train (with a reduced load) and learn. I reserve the right to pull anyone from an activity if I feel it is unsafe for them to participate.

I’ve included links to many of the items for clarity and also to help you source them, although you can bring whatever you want as long as the items meet the criteria. I get no kickback whatsoever if you use these links, I just prefer to go through good small businesses instead of through Amazon.

How you pack and carry your equipment is up to you, although I hope that by doing this class you come away with a very refined system that works for you if you don’t have one already. My advice: keep your pack-list light and tight. If you’re just starting out please don’t hesitate to email me with questions, I want everyone’s time to be as productive as possible.

Navigation and note taking – I highly advise the Suunto MC2NH if you have never done land navigation before. Because of this I will be teaching based off this compass and will require every student to have one. If you have other compasses you like to use feel free to bring them and use them as well.

  • Suunto MC2NH Compass
  • 1:10,000 scale protractor
  • Map pens
  • 3x mechanical pencils
  • 3×5 rite in the rain notepad
  • 8 1/2 x 11 rite in the rain notebook for notes and PAUL maps
  • Pace beads if wanted
  • Head lamp with red lens and spare batteries
  • A copy of the Ranger Handbook. I’ve been looking through several different editions and I can’t really say which to get. The older ones I’ve read through seem to be shorter with fewer pictures and diagrams whereas the newer ones are longer and seem to have more descriptive pictures and diagrams, but also a lot of information that isn’t really applicable to civilians. It’s a classic piece of military knowledge with roots back to the 1700’s so you can’t go wrong studying multiple editions.
  • Cloth roll up measuring tape
  • GPS (of any form) is not allowed during the class and completely defeats the purpose of the class.

Emergency Equipment – The area where we will be training is rough and remote and there isn’t much for cell coverage. Because of this we will utilize radios to stay in contact as well as have some back up emergency signal equipment.

  • Whistle
  • Small air horn
  • FRS radio or Baofeng UV-5R (or equivalent if a licensed ham operator) in waterproof bag with spare batteries. Read the manual and familiarize yourself with it before coming to class please.
  • XXXL Hunter’s orange vest (in other words as big as you can find, needs to fit over you and your gear)
  • 1 roll Orange flagging/ surveyors tape
  • 3x orange chem lights
  • Individual First Aid Kit with minimum one CAT tourniquet placed in a readily accessible location on your gear.
  • Small “boo boo” kit for cuts and scrapes. Should include assorted band aids, Triple antibiotic ointment, Benzoin ampules, Moleskin, iodine pads, Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Immodium, Benadryl.

Survival and Field Equipment

  • Fixed blade belt knife meeting the following criteria:
    • Full tang
    • High Carbon steel
    • Non-coated (Blued knives will still work)
    • 4-6 inch blade length
    • 90 degree spine
  • Multitool with the following tools:
    • Knife
    • Wood saw
    • File
    • Awl
  • Folding saw
  • Entrenching tool
  • Wrist watch (No GPS)
  • 1/2” x 6” Ferro Rod
  • Large Bic lighter
  • Shemagh
  • 1 square foot 100% untreated cotton cloth. Cheap dish towels and polishing rags work great.
  • 32 ounce single wall stainless container with nesting cup
  • 100’ #36 bank line
  • 100’ 550 cord (earth tone color)
  • 25’ jute twine
  • 6x tent stakes
  • Military style casualty blanket, OD or Camo
  • Small folded Mylar survival blanket
  • Appropriate layers, clothing and spares for the season.
  • Good hiking/ combat boots
  • Appropriate sleep gear for season. The following is a recommendation based off what I would bring for the particular time of year, but you are welcome to bring whatever you like as long as you can carry it:
    • Summer – Poncho and Poncho liner
    • Late Spring/ Early Fall – Goretex Bivy Bag and green bag from MMSS (or equivalent) plus summer equipment
    • Early spring/ late fall – Goretex Bivy Bag and black bag from MMSS (or equivalent) plus summer equipment
    • Insulating mat and inflatable pillow. I use the Klymit Static-V pad and pillow. If I’m only getting a few hours sleep I want them to be good.
  • 2x 3-6 mil 55 gallon drum liners
  • Canvas repair needle
  • Roll of 1” Gorilla tape
  • Roll of electrical tape
  • 3 days of food that can be prepared and eaten in the field.
  • Electrolyte supplements. Gatorade, Salt and Sugar, Pedialyte powder, etc.
  • Eating utensil
  • Iodine tablets and neutralizer
  • Hygiene gear and poop kit. There will be no facilities available so plan accordingly.
  • Your preferred ruck to carry it all.
  • Optional- water filter, I only use Sawyer and Grayl filters personally. Check for a filtering level of .1 microns absolute or smaller. We will be sourcing water off the landscape so keep this in mind.
  • Optional- additional water bottles, canteens or Camelbak
  • Optional- jet boil or alcohol stove. If you are going to be needing to boil water in order to eat your food bring a stove to boil it in. We will be making our own fires off the landscape but not for every meal.

Tactical Equipment

  • Modern self-loading centerfire rifle with sling. (.308 or less in power)
  • 100 rounds of ammunition. No penetrator ammo. Marksmanship training will consist of position building exercises, dry fire and unknown distance engagements out to 500+ yards.
  • Optional- Snap cap if wanted for dry firing
  • Enough empty magazines to carry a minimum of 200 rounds ammunition. This is to ensure the student has the capability to carry an average, standardized load of ammunition. These will be empty mags.
  • 1 quarter
  • Your preferred style of tactical load bearing equipment.
  • Cleaning gear, tools, spare batteries and spare parts for weapon system and optics. I will have a full tool set on site but bring the tools specific to your equipment as well.
  • Coyote and OD sniper veil. Spray paint one side the opposite color. For example, if using a tan veil paint one side OD so it’s reversible.
  • Camo face paint
  • Earth toned or camouflaged clothing
  • Optional- Any day or night optics you would typically carry
  • Optional- shooting aids such as bipods, tripods, etc.
  • Optional – Viper hood/ Ghillie and Ghillie thread

26 comments

  1. […] Studying planning processes is a very deep rabbit hole and while not as “fun” as other skill sets, it’s critical to be a good planner. We’ve probably all heard the phrase “Shit in, shit out”, referring to the quality of the inputs affecting the quality of the outputs, and it couldn’t be more true when it comes to planning. I include numerous opportunities for students to practice this skill in the Fieldcraft Class. […]

    Like

  2. […] I just spent day working out on the course. I put in 18 land nav points over a few square miles. I also took the opportunity to scout some more of the terrain and I found some very interesting places. I think in both terms of natural beauty and subject matter, the land nav courses will be hard to beat. I’ve got about 2 spots left in in April’s class and I’m about half full in May’s, so if you’re interested be sure to get ahold of me. […]

    Like

  3. […] I just spent day working out on the course. I put in 18 land nav points over a few square miles. I also took the opportunity to scout some more of the terrain and I found some very interesting places. I think in both terms of natural beauty and subject matter, the land nav courses will be hard to beat. I’ve got about 2 spots left in in April’s class and I’m about half full in May’s, so if you’re interested be sure to get ahold of me. […]

    Like

  4. […] Violence of Action. Making fast decisions, getting off the X quickly, and fixing and flanking their enemy were all critical to the success of these men. Violence of action is the difference between life and death in a fight. The following two videos are excellent depictions of fire and maneuver, a topic among many we will be covering in the Fieldcraft Course. […]

    Like

  5. […] The Swagman Roll has become a permanent part of my line 3 gear alongside my poncho. With the combination of the two and a space blanket I’m good in conditions down to about freezing (your mileage may vary depending on how much suck you can embrace) as long as I can prepare a browse bed of some sort. If I want to add to this further I just grab my goretex bivy bag and a set of USGI field jacket and pants liners, and I’m sleeping toasty. For an opportunity to learn more about your own kit as well as see how others are doing it, be sure … […]

    Like

  6. […] No, not that tinder.. fire starting tinder. I was driving through a small grove of cottonwood trees and couldn’t help but notice all the great tinder hanging off the branches and drying in the wind, just waiting for me to pick it. I left it for another day, but it doesn’t hurt to keep an eye out for resources as you come across them. I decided to take a few minutes and walk around and see what other resources there were. Creating fire off the landscape is a topic we will be covering in the fieldcraft course. […]

    Like

  7. […] The Swagman Roll has become a permanent part of my line 3 gear alongside my poncho. With the combination of the two and a space blanket I’m good in conditions down to about freezing (your mileage may vary depending on how much suck you can embrace) as long as I can prepare a browse bed of some sort. If I want to add to this further I just grab my goretex bivy bag and a set of USGI field jacket and pants liners, and I’m sleeping toasty. For an opportunity to learn more about your own kit as well as see how others are doing it, be sure … […]

    Like

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