The Fieldcraft Course

The Fieldcraft Class – Description

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Last updated 23DEC2021

What is Fieldcraft? – It is the skills and knowledge necessary to beat man’s oldest adversary, nature, as well as techniques to defend themselves from other hostile men. Fieldcraft techniques have been being developed and perfected since man first ventured out to scout and hunt for game. Since at least the 1600’s, it has been perfected through warfare, becoming the combination of field skills essential to small unit maneuver warfare. From the first European skirmishers and light infantry during the 1600’s, to the American revolutionaries, mountain men and longhunters scouting the frontier, to Confederate guerillas, to the desert rats of World War Two, and to the modern day Infantryman, sniper, and scout, good fieldcraft has always been a necessary skill to ensure their survival in austere environments, amongst their enemies, and with little to no support.

For the prepared citizen, when the rule of law has failed, fieldcraft skills are necessary to expand or protect a perimeter, or to ensure safe passage through a hostile area. Without this critical capability, a prepared man looking to defend his home or protect his family and property is very restricted in how he can defend them. Without the capability to extend his perimeter and detect threats early, this man is a sitting duck waiting to get flanked by those who can operate in the field. Likewise, without the ability to move through a hostile area safely and efficiently, he will become another victim to those preying on refugees.

What is the Fieldcraft Course? – A completely off-grid course that takes place over 4 days in the Badlands of Montana. Students will learn practical skills to ensure their survival against nature, and then be taught skills that will help them successfully fight in small teams against hostile men.

Although I am an Infantry Marine, my teaching style is one that emphasizes a comfortable learning environment with no “drill instructor” mentality or silly games. My goal is to give my students the biggest “bang for the buck” I can, delivering as much knowledge in our time together as I can.

Students will be challenged with long days (16-hour training days are the norm, as well as covering 2-3 miles a day on foot conducting land navigation and other training) as we cover as much material as we can. If they apply themselves and work hard, students should expect to leave with confidence in the following subjects:

  • Shelter construction
  • Fire making
  • Water Disinfection
  • Rifle marksmanship
  • Concealment
  • Observation
  • Basic small unit tactics

Price is $400 per person; cash, money order or barter. Payment is due in full 2 weeks prior to class unless other arrangements are made. Cancel within two weeks of class for a full refund.

Class location is in southeastern Montana. The nearest “large” airports are Rapid City, SD, Billings, MT, and Bismarck, ND. The road into the training area is primitive and a 4×4 is advised. If you’re renting a vehicle, or other wise don’t have access to a 4×4, transportation into the site will be provided.

A few reviews from some of my students are available here:

To register email me at shocktroop0351@tutanota.com.

52 comments

  1. […] Studying planning processes is a very deep rabbit hole and while not as “fun” as other skill sets, it’s critical to be a good planner. We’ve probably all heard the phrase “Shit in, shit out”, referring to the quality of the inputs affecting the quality of the outputs, and it couldn’t be more true when it comes to planning. I include numerous opportunities for students to practice this skill in the Fieldcraft Class. […]

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  2. […] I just spent day working out on the course. I put in 18 land nav points over a few square miles. I also took the opportunity to scout some more of the terrain and I found some very interesting places. I think in both terms of natural beauty and subject matter, the land nav courses will be hard to beat. I’ve got about 2 spots left in in April’s class and I’m about half full in May’s, so if you’re interested be sure to get ahold of me. […]

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  3. […] I just spent day working out on the course. I put in 18 land nav points over a few square miles. I also took the opportunity to scout some more of the terrain and I found some very interesting places. I think in both terms of natural beauty and subject matter, the land nav courses will be hard to beat. I’ve got about 2 spots left in in April’s class and I’m about half full in May’s, so if you’re interested be sure to get ahold of me. […]

    Like

  4. […] Violence of Action. Making fast decisions, getting off the X quickly, and fixing and flanking their enemy were all critical to the success of these men. Violence of action is the difference between life and death in a fight. The following two videos are excellent depictions of fire and maneuver, a topic among many we will be covering in the Fieldcraft Course. […]

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  5. […] The Swagman Roll has become a permanent part of my line 3 gear alongside my poncho. With the combination of the two and a space blanket I’m good in conditions down to about freezing (your mileage may vary depending on how much suck you can embrace) as long as I can prepare a browse bed of some sort. If I want to add to this further I just grab my goretex bivy bag and a set of USGI field jacket and pants liners, and I’m sleeping toasty. For an opportunity to learn more about your own kit as well as see how others are doing it, be sure … […]

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  6. […] No, not that tinder.. fire starting tinder. I was driving through a small grove of cottonwood trees and couldn’t help but notice all the great tinder hanging off the branches and drying in the wind, just waiting for me to pick it. I left it for another day, but it doesn’t hurt to keep an eye out for resources as you come across them. I decided to take a few minutes and walk around and see what other resources there were. Creating fire off the landscape is a topic we will be covering in the fieldcraft course. […]

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  7. […] The Swagman Roll has become a permanent part of my line 3 gear alongside my poncho. With the combination of the two and a space blanket I’m good in conditions down to about freezing (your mileage may vary depending on how much suck you can embrace) as long as I can prepare a browse bed of some sort. If I want to add to this further I just grab my goretex bivy bag and a set of USGI field jacket and pants liners, and I’m sleeping toasty. For an opportunity to learn more about your own kit as well as see how others are doing it, be sure … […]

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  8. […] podcast, Radio Contra. We had a good visit about land navigation, training, what to expect at my Fieldcraft Course as well as what we look for in knives. It was a great time and I looked forward to the next time I […]

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  9. […] You also need to be able to keep track of the distance you have traveled. GPS is a great tool when it works, but unconventional units have to be able to operate without it. A key lesson driven home during the class was “if you don’t own the infrastructure you don’t have it” and that applies to GPS as well. For those looking for what has been said to be an “exceptional land navigation class” (among oth… […]

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  10. […] As someone who instructs a course in Fieldcraft, I thought I should check this book out. For one, I’m always looking for more tidbits to add to my collection of fieldcraft knowledge, and Joe didn’t disappoint. I liked how he had gathered information from many different sources, and compiled them in a text that gives the reader a good sampling of each. While I would never consider myself the ultimate authority on anything, I know a few things, and Joe’s book helped me learn a few more. […]

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